Different Types of Windows

Eden Windows can help in finding suitable windows and doors for the diverse house styles across Kent & South East London.
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What are the different types of houses?

These are various house types found across Kent and South East London, each with its own architectural style and requirements when it comes to choosing windows and doors. They can be categorised by their features and the time in which they were built.

The original features found in each house style were purposefully designed to create a unified appearance. However, throughout time, some homeowners have undertaken renovations, like new windows and doors, that no longer complement their original styling.

Georgian home
Be considerate of your home’s style

To ensure your home is looking its best, you should be considerate of the original style when replacing such features. Replacing original timber sash windows with UPVC casement windows, for example, may lower the value of the property. Additionally, certain houses are subject to restrictions due to their location within conservation areas or their status as listed buildings.

We believe it is essential to identify the period and style of your property before taking on renovations. This guide will explore the various types of British houses and styles typically found across Kent and South East London, as well as the recommended suitable door and window replacements.

Modern build

TYPES OF HOMES IN KENT & SOUTH EAST LONDON

Do you recognise your style of home below? As we explore the different types of homes that are popular within Kent and South East London, we hope you’ll find inspiration in finding windows and doors that will uphold your property’s character and style. After all, windows and doors play a significant role in defining the visual appeal of a property.

Georgian home
Georgian

1714 to 1830’s

Victorian home
Victorian

1800s to 1900’s

Edwardian home
Edwardian

1890’s

1930s home
1930’s

Semi & Detached

1960s home
1960’s

1960-1970’s

90/00s New Build
90/00s New Build

1990-today

Modern build
Modern Build

1990’s onwards

Cottage
Cottage

1550 to 1650

Georgian homes

Georgian homes were built between 1714 and the 1830s, and are well-known for their elegant and refined architecture. During this era, sash windows played an instrumental role in the overall look and feel of Georgian houses.

Georgian architecture emerged when the British monarchs from George I to George IV were in power. These homes often feature brick or stone exteriors, symmetrical facades, classical architectural elements, and roofs with either hipped or gabled structures. Inside, you’ll discover spacious rooms, high ceilings, and an abundance of natural light, all contributing to the distinctive charm of Georgian homes.

Georgian home
For Georgian homes we would recommend

In Georgian architecture, sash windows stand out as a distinct characteristic. These windows are composed of one or more movable panels, known as “sashes,” which slide vertically within the window frame. A key feature of Georgian sash windows is the use of glazing bars to divide them into smaller panes. The most common configurations are six-over-six or eight-over-eight, where the panes form a grid pattern. Besides providing efficient ventilation, sash windows add an element of grace and sophistication to Georgian homes across Kent and South East London.

UPVC Sash Windows

Sash Windows

With georgian bar in white UPVC

Forté Composite Doors

Composite Door

Choose from our Forté door range

Victorian terraced homes

Victorian terraced homes were notable for their slender yet towering structures, commonly lining the city streets in uniform rows. These houses exhibited a diverse range of architectural styles, incorporating elements of Gothic Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, and Neo-Classical designs.

Constructed primarily using brick or stone, the exteriors boasted intricate mouldings, ornate ironwork, and vibrant brickwork patterns. Typically spanning multiple stories, they often allocated the ground floor as a parlour, while the upper floors served as residential living spaces.

Victorian home
For Victorian terraced homes we would recommend

During the Victorian era, sash windows, reminiscent of those found in Georgian architecture, retained their popularity. These windows were characterised by one or more movable panels, known as “sashes,” that could be vertically or horizontally slid within the frame. Victorian terraced homes, in particular, showcased distinctive UPVC bay windows, which has contributed to a grand appearance of this style of home.

UPVC Sash Windows

Sash Windows

With georgian bar in white UPVC

White UPVC Bay & Bow Windows

Bay Windows

With Georgian bar or decorative finishes

Edwardian homes

The Edwardian era, spanning from 1900 to 1918, marked a relatively short period named after King Edward VII. Edwardian semi-detached homes were built on more generous plots, differing from the compact Victorian terraces.

Influenced by Baroque and the Arts and Crafts movement, these houses boasted a distinct architectural style that remains recognisable today.

Edwardian home
For Edwardian homes we would recommend:

For Edwardian homes, we recommend opting for UPVC or timber casement windows in classic shades of white or black. These window styles beautifully complement the architectural aesthetics of Edwardian properties. For a traditional touch, popular colour options for Edwardian windows include white, black, brown, and blue. Alternatively, a natural varnished timber finish can bring out the timeless beauty of the property.

White UPVC Casement Windows

Casement Windows

With UPVC frames

Evolution Windows

Evolution Windows

With a timber finish

1930’s homes

During this era, transport links improved, and more houses were built beyond cities. The 1930s semi-detached homes, like their Edwardian predecessors, often displayed a combination of half brick and half render or pebble dash walls. Some homes incorporated mock timber framing or herringbone brickwork for added visual interest.

Bay windows spanning multiple floors showcased white or black frame windows with diamond-shaped leaded strips. A distinctive feature was the recessed porch with a curved roof, while front doors boasted glazed panels, side windows, and stained glass, contributing to their unique style.

1930s home
For 1930’s Semi homes we would recommend:

Opt for UPVC or aluminium casement windows with leaded strip detailing, featuring internal Georgian bars and frames in white or black. To maintain the era’s aesthetic, traditional colours like white, black, brown, and blue, or a natural varnished timber finish, complement the style of 1930s properties.

White UPVC Casement Windows

UPVC Windows

Available in a range of finishes

Aluminium Flush Windows

Aluminium Windows

With an elegant and modern finish

1960’s Semi homes

The walls of 1960’s semi homes often showcased light brown or grey bricks, partially clad with weatherboards or concrete hanging tiles. With the decline of coal fires, chimneys started to disappear from the architectural landscape.

Windows underwent a transformation in this era, becoming larger in size. Casement windows, often framed with aluminium, were prevalent, allowing ample natural light to flood the interiors.

1960s home
For 1960’s Semi homes we would recommend:

Opt for casement windows made of UPVC or aluminium, available in classic shades of white or grey. These windows will not only align with the architectural style of 1960s homes but also provide functionality and a modern touch.  Alternatively, you can explore shades like yellow or pale blue to add a subtle pop of colour, enhancing the overall aesthetic of your 1960s property.

White UPVC Casement Windows

UPVC Windows

Available in a range of finishes

Aluminium Flush Windows

Aluminium Windows

With an elegant and modern finish

90/00s New Build homes

With a focus on energy efficiency, these new builds commonly incorporate small double or triple glazed UPVC windows. Some windows may feature cottage-style Georgian bars, adding a decorative touch to the design.

The front doors of these homes are typically made of UPVC or composite materials and often include a small-glazed panel. This style of home is a common sight in Kent and South East London, they’re known for their versatility, with the potential for coloured window frames and coordinated door and window frame colours, allowing for personalised touches.

90s New Build
For 90/00s New Build homes we would recommend:

We suggest opting for UPVC casement or tilt and turn windows. These windows offer durability and energy efficiency while providing functionality. Grey or white finishes are popular choices, as they blend seamlessly with the contemporary aesthetic of New Build homes. Alternatively, you can explore a range of bright colours to add a vibrant touch that complements the brickwork and adds a distinctive flair to the overall design of your New Build property.

White UPVC Casement Windows

Casement Windows

With UPVC frames

UPVC Tilt & Turn Windows

Tilt & Turn Windows

Versatile windows for new builds

Modern Self Build homes

These homes often showcase expansive floor-to-ceiling glazing, allowing an abundance of natural light to fill the interiors while creating a seamless connection with the surrounding environment. Materials commonly found in commercial construction, such as steel, glass, and concrete, are frequently used in the construction of these modern dwellings.

Modern self build homes feature large-glazed areas, utilising robust aluminium frames to achieve a distinctively sleek appearance. Doors in these homes can be oversized, available in natural timber, aluminium, or seamlessly integrated with the glazing for a cohesive and contemporary aesthetic.

Modern build
For Modern Self Build homes we would recommend:

Opt for sleek and contemporary aluminium or UPVC flush sash frames. Dark grey or black finishes are ideal choices, as they complement the modern aesthetic of these properties, adding a touch of sophistication.

Envisage Flush Window

Flush Windows

Minimalistic and modern frames

Aluminium Flush Windows

Aluminium Windows

With an elegant and modern finish

Stone Cottage homes

Cottages are frequently found in short terraced rows, and if they are not listed buildings, they may still face limitations due to conservation area regulations, especially in National Park locations.

Characteristics of cottages are their low ceilings and small windows. Depending on the cottage’s age, the windows are typically either timber casement or sash style, with timber casements being more common. Front doors of cottages usually feature timber construction, and stable door styles are particularly popular, further enhancing the traditional and rustic appeal of these charming homes.